Using Meta Tags in your HTML documents will help you get hits.


Why use Meta Tags in your HTML documents?

This page has examples of the various tags, and an excerpt from the infoseek site on meta tags. You should use meta tags to help you get indexed in the search engines. This will substantially increase your exposure. Meta tags are picked up by web robots that are sent out. The information returned is used to index your site. Be aware that redundant use of keywords actually reduces your exposure. Also, limit keywords to 1,000 characters. Also, if your use FRAMES you should put the tags in your MAIN page. This information was gathered from Internet resources at large and is provided as a service to our clients.


example:

     <html><head>
     <meta http-equiv="description" content="Tips on obtaining venture
      capital for your hi-tech start-up.">
     <meta name="keywords" content="asset based lending, capital
     enterprise funding, equity funding, expansion capital, funds for
     growth, growth financing, underwriting, venture investment">
            <title>Hi-Tech Venture Capital</title>
     </head> 

=========
Meta tags have two possible attributes:
  <meta http-equiv="name" content="content">
  <meta name="name" content="content">
META tags should be placed in the head of the HTML document, between the <HEAD> and </HEAD> tags (especially important in documents using FRAMES).
HTTP-EQUIV tags

Meta tags with an HTTP-EQUIV attribute are equivalent to HTTP headers. Typically, they control the action of browsers, and may be used to refine the information provided by the actual headers. Tags using this form should have an equivalent effect when specified as an HTTP header, and in some servers may be translated to actual HTTP headers automatically or by a pre-processing tool.

================
<meta http-equiv="expires" content="Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT">

or (HTTP header):

Expires: Wed, 26 Feb 1997 08:21:57 GMT

==========

<meta http-equiv="Content-language" content="en-GB">

or (HTTP header) 

Content-language: en-GB

languages are specified as the pair (language-dialect); here, 
English-British 

==========

Specifies a delay in seconds before the browser automatically reloads
the document. Optionally, specifies an alternative URL to load. E.G. 


<meta http-equiv="Refresh" content="3;URL=http://www.dcllabs.net/">

or (HTTP header) 

Refresh: 3;URL=http://www.some.org/some.html

==========================

Window-target:

Specifies the named window of the current page; can be used to stop a
page appearing in a frame with many (not all) browsers. E.g. 

<meta http-equiv="window-target" content="_top"> or (HTTP header) Window-target: _top ================
NAME attributes:

Meta tags with a name attribute are used for other types which do not correspond to HTTP headers. Sometimes the distinction is blurred; some agents may interpret tags such as "keywords" declared as either "name" or as "http-equiv".

===============

Robots  Source: Spidering 

Controls Web robots on a per-page basis. E.g. 

<meta name="robots" content="NOINDEX,FOLLOW">


Robots may traverse this page but not index it. 

===================

Using META Tags to Create the Summary Description

The meta tag description field can be used to specify an exact description of your site. The META tags you use will not display on your Web page. However, it will determine the summary description when your site is retrieved as a search result. Make sure that your description adequately summarizes the contents of your site. Your description can include up to 200 characters of text. If you do not use META tags to describe your site, the Web page description will be derived from the first 200 characters in the HTML <BODY> field.

In your main HTML file (the file containing the <FRAMESET> tags); use the <META> tag within the <HEAD> element as follows:

    <meta name="description" content="Write your description here">

Do not use any HTML tags within the description or content part of the
META tag. 

     Example:

     Suppose the HTML at the top of your Web page looked like: 

  <html><head>
  <meta name="description" content="DCL Labs - System Specialist in Network Operating Systems.  - Local and wide area networks.">
     <title>DCL Labs</title>
  </head>

   The following title and description would appear when your page is
   displayed as a search result. 

DCL Labs
DCL Labs - System Specialist in Network Operating Systems. - Local and wide area networks.   11,455 bytes


Using META Tags to Define Index Terms for Your Page

When a site is added to Infoseek's index, all the words on the page are included with the exception of any text within a <!-- Comments placed here --> field. The META tag keyword field can be used to specify additional key words or synonyms that describe the contents of your site. META tag keywords are used in the indexing process but will not display on your Web page. The keywords can include up to 200 characters of text. Not that long ago you could add up to 1000 characters. This has since changed due to the fact that there so many web sites that the search engines just can't or won't hold all that data anymore. You must be sure that the key words you choose are relevant to the contents of your page.

  Example:

  <meta name="keywords" content="Write your keywords here, in a comma
  separated list"> 

For example, if the HTML at the top of your Web page looked like:

 <html><head>
   <meta name="description" content="Tips on obtaining venture
    capital for your hi-tech start-up.">
   <meta name="keywords" content="asset based lending, capital
    enterprise funding, equity funding, expansion capital, funds for
    growth, growth financing, underwriting, venture investment">
      <title>Hi-Tech Venture Capital</title>
 </head>

Any of the keywords searched for, and listed,  would bring back this 
page's description to that user.

Javascript, Frames & Images

If your Web page uses JavaScript functions within the first 200 characters of the site you should use <META> tags to provide a description for your page.

For sites using Netscape Frames, the file containing the <FRAMESET> tag should include a META tag description summary of all the frames on that particular page.

If your site mainly consists of graphics, you can also use the HTML ALT attribute to describe that particular graphic file.

Example:

     Infoseek indexes the ALT attributes in the <IMG> tag.

     <img src="/images/shooter.gif" alt="picture of a 
     great shooter">

How to Improve Your Site's Relevancy

We are often asked, "Could you share the secret formula for improving my site's relevancy?" Our reply is the same to our users as well as our partners:

Use a highly descriptive title, include a META tag description, and create META tag keywords that contain comma-separated phrases. Use an assortment of synonyms that accurately describe your site, but don't try to boost your site's relevance by repeating keywords. The overuse and repetition of keywords may result in a lower relevancy score and possible omission from any Search Engine's index.

==================

Where to put the Robots META tag.   Note: Currently only few robots support this tag!
Like any META tag it should be placed in the HEAD section of an
HTML page: 

   <html><head>
     <meta name="robots" content="noindex,nofollow">
     <meta name="description" content="This page ...">
        <title>Title of your Page</title>
   </head>
   <body>

What to put into the Robots META tag

The content of the Robots META tag contains directives separated by commas. The currently defined directives are [NO]INDEX and [NO]FOLLOW. The INDEX directive specifies if an indexing robot should index the page. The FOLLOW directive specifies if a robot is to follow links on the page. The defaults are INDEX and FOLLOW. The values ALL and NONE set all directives on or off: ALL=INDEX,FOLLOW and NONE=NOINDEX,NOFOLLOW.

Some examples:
 <meta name="robots" content="index,follow">

 <meta name="robots" content="noindex,follow">

 <meta name="robots" content="index,nofollow">

 <meta name="robots" content="noindex,nofollow">


Note the "robots" name of the tag and the content are case insensitive. 

You obviously should not specify conflicting or repeating directives
such as: 

 <meta name="robots" content="INDEX,NOINDEX,NOFOLLOW,FOLLOW,FOLLOW">


A formal syntax for the Robots META tag content is:

  content    = all | none | directives>
  all        = "ALL">
  none       = "NONE">
  directives = directive ["," directives]>
  directive  = index | follow>
  index      = "INDEX" | "NOINDEX">
  follow     = "FOLLOW" | "NOFOLLOW"> 

" target=_top>Back  |   Top of Page